Presenter Information

Sean KingFollow
Matthew SignorFollow

Submission Type

Poster

Start Date

22-4-2020 12:00 AM

Abstract

High Energy Density Physics and Inertial Confinement Fusion facilities employ nTOF methods to measure neutron energies. Laser induced fusion facilities use the beam pulse as a start signal and Xylene scintillators as the stop signal to obtain the time of flight. To improve timing performance, the scintillator liquid is quenched with oxygen reducing the light production. However, oxygen reacts with the scintillator liquid causing the detector photo flash decay time to increase that reduces the energy resolution of the detector. An in-situ monitoring system which uses cosmic ray muons to determine the oxygen concentration, is being developed at SUNY Geneseo. The method uses a stack of one EJ200 plastic scintillator with the oxygenated xylene detector below it. As cosmic ray muons pass through the stacked detectors, a coincidence signal is produced by the electronics indicating an event has occurred within a few nanoseconds confirming a muon passed through the stack. The signal fit-parameters of the xylene are good indicators of the oxygen concentration. Over the summer of 2019, a proof of concept was deemed successful in measuring a difference in oxygen levels. Throughout the 2019-2020 school year, a larger detector has been built to amplify the count rate and expedite data acquisition.

Comments

Sponsored by Dr. Stephen Padalino

Acknowledgements:

Laboratory for Laser Energetics

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 AM

293— MOLY - Monitoring Oxygen Levels in nTOF Scintillators using Cosmic Ray Muons

High Energy Density Physics and Inertial Confinement Fusion facilities employ nTOF methods to measure neutron energies. Laser induced fusion facilities use the beam pulse as a start signal and Xylene scintillators as the stop signal to obtain the time of flight. To improve timing performance, the scintillator liquid is quenched with oxygen reducing the light production. However, oxygen reacts with the scintillator liquid causing the detector photo flash decay time to increase that reduces the energy resolution of the detector. An in-situ monitoring system which uses cosmic ray muons to determine the oxygen concentration, is being developed at SUNY Geneseo. The method uses a stack of one EJ200 plastic scintillator with the oxygenated xylene detector below it. As cosmic ray muons pass through the stacked detectors, a coincidence signal is produced by the electronics indicating an event has occurred within a few nanoseconds confirming a muon passed through the stack. The signal fit-parameters of the xylene are good indicators of the oxygen concentration. Over the summer of 2019, a proof of concept was deemed successful in measuring a difference in oxygen levels. Throughout the 2019-2020 school year, a larger detector has been built to amplify the count rate and expedite data acquisition.

 

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