Presenter Information

Jillian DeMaria, SUNY GeneseoFollow

Submission Type

Poster

Start Date

22-4-2020 12:00 AM

Abstract

From the late nineteenth and early twentieth century industrialization changed many aspects of American life. Mortality rates in the pre World War I era (1838 and 1930) changed due to many improvements of public health. The creation and emphasis over vaccinations, sewage systems, inspections of foods, and overall improvements in living and working conditions improved public health outcomes in all parts of America, in both rural and urban areas. As the changes occurred, tuberculosis mortality rates declined. This study explores death rates of tuberculosis in rural and urban areas, as well as the general population of Rochester, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in New York State, before the introduction of antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to connect the change in mortality rates with improvements in public health across the state. Tuberculosis mortality rates from poorhouses are also being compared to the general population in Rochester, as represented by the data collected from Mt. Hope Cemetery. Due to public health improvements over the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century, mortality rates of communicable diseases like tuberculosis declined over time.

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Sponsored by Kristi Krumrine

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Apr 22nd, 12:00 AM

399— Rates of Tuberculosis Mortality Rates in Urban and Rural Areas of New York State Before the Age of Antibiotics

From the late nineteenth and early twentieth century industrialization changed many aspects of American life. Mortality rates in the pre World War I era (1838 and 1930) changed due to many improvements of public health. The creation and emphasis over vaccinations, sewage systems, inspections of foods, and overall improvements in living and working conditions improved public health outcomes in all parts of America, in both rural and urban areas. As the changes occurred, tuberculosis mortality rates declined. This study explores death rates of tuberculosis in rural and urban areas, as well as the general population of Rochester, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in New York State, before the introduction of antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to connect the change in mortality rates with improvements in public health across the state. Tuberculosis mortality rates from poorhouses are also being compared to the general population in Rochester, as represented by the data collected from Mt. Hope Cemetery. Due to public health improvements over the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century, mortality rates of communicable diseases like tuberculosis declined over time.

 

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