Submission Title

039— Daily Attention Bias

Submission Type

Poster

Start Date

4-26-2021

Abstract

Previous research has shown a correlation between anxiety and attentional bias to threat. For anxious individuals, attentional bias to threat has been shown to activate areas in the brain such as the amygdala. The amygdala is (i) associated with fear and anxiety, (ii) involved in the link between anxiety and hyper-vigilance for threat, and (iii) exerts excitatory influence on the release of cortisol, the stress hormone, which follows a daily (diurnal) pattern. Previous research has yet to study the diurnal patterns of attention bias to threat and its association with levels of anxiety. To address this gap, we examined whether attention biases to threat follows a similar pattern of daily fluctuations, and if the variation in that pattern relates to levels of anxiety. To assess this relationship, SUNY Geneseo students completed the Dot-Probe paradigm, which is a commonly used method to measure attention to threat, at five time periods in one day. The hypothesis is that attentional biases will follow a similar diurnal pattern as seen with cortisol levels, and this pattern will be related to daily fluctuations in anxiety. The study’s findings showed that participants with higher levels of anxiety had a greater threat bias.

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Sponsored by Bradley Taber-Thomas

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM

039— Daily Attention Bias

Previous research has shown a correlation between anxiety and attentional bias to threat. For anxious individuals, attentional bias to threat has been shown to activate areas in the brain such as the amygdala. The amygdala is (i) associated with fear and anxiety, (ii) involved in the link between anxiety and hyper-vigilance for threat, and (iii) exerts excitatory influence on the release of cortisol, the stress hormone, which follows a daily (diurnal) pattern. Previous research has yet to study the diurnal patterns of attention bias to threat and its association with levels of anxiety. To address this gap, we examined whether attention biases to threat follows a similar pattern of daily fluctuations, and if the variation in that pattern relates to levels of anxiety. To assess this relationship, SUNY Geneseo students completed the Dot-Probe paradigm, which is a commonly used method to measure attention to threat, at five time periods in one day. The hypothesis is that attentional biases will follow a similar diurnal pattern as seen with cortisol levels, and this pattern will be related to daily fluctuations in anxiety. The study’s findings showed that participants with higher levels of anxiety had a greater threat bias.

 

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