Presenter Information

Nicole Gindling, SUNY GeneseoFollow

Submission Type

Poster

Start Date

4-21-2022

Abstract

The short-lived isotope counting system (SLICS) being built for the OMEGA laser facility at LLE requires short-lived radioisotopes, such as 64Cu, for testing and calibration purposes. Using the SUNY Geneseo neutron howitzer, which contains a Plutonium-Beryllium (Pu-Be) source, 63Cu was bombarded with water moderated thermal neutrons to produce 64Cu via the 63Cu(n,γ) capture reaction. The 12.7 hour half-life of 64Cu allowed it to be transported to Houghton College where its signature was measured as a possible background to 66Cu used in future “exploding wire” experiments to simulate detection of radioisotopes produced in ICF implosion.

Comments

Sponsored by Stephen Padalino

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Apr 21st, 12:00 AM

71 -- Using a 64Cu Source to Test SLICS

The short-lived isotope counting system (SLICS) being built for the OMEGA laser facility at LLE requires short-lived radioisotopes, such as 64Cu, for testing and calibration purposes. Using the SUNY Geneseo neutron howitzer, which contains a Plutonium-Beryllium (Pu-Be) source, 63Cu was bombarded with water moderated thermal neutrons to produce 64Cu via the 63Cu(n,γ) capture reaction. The 12.7 hour half-life of 64Cu allowed it to be transported to Houghton College where its signature was measured as a possible background to 66Cu used in future “exploding wire” experiments to simulate detection of radioisotopes produced in ICF implosion.

 

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