Submission Type

Poster

Start Date

4-21-2022

Abstract

Non-intrusive geophysical imaging is a major source of information used in a variety of applications, including environmental and construction surveys. This imaging has long been successfully performed through several techniques such as ground-penetrating radar and seismic tomography. In this work, we collected and analyzed data with a spring based gravimeter to explore the variation in gravity across two subterranean fuel tanks used by Facilities here at the College. We began by establishing a base station for comparison, then measured the gravity relative to that base station at ten points along a thirty meter line. When viewed in relation to the expected gravitational value of an undisturbed subsurface, negative anomalies were visible at locations where the tanks are stored, which is consistent with what would be expected from a subterranean space that was less dense than the surrounding ground. Three separate analyses were performed, with varying results. The horizontal position of the pair of fuel tanks was derived with sufficient accuracy, but determining their dimensions and depth was less successful. Nevertheless, these results were promising. Expanding our surveyed points from a single line to a two dimensional grid would be the next logical step with this research.

Comments

Sponsored by Scott Giorgis

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 12:00 AM

246 -- Gravimetric Detection of Subterranean Fuel Tanks

Non-intrusive geophysical imaging is a major source of information used in a variety of applications, including environmental and construction surveys. This imaging has long been successfully performed through several techniques such as ground-penetrating radar and seismic tomography. In this work, we collected and analyzed data with a spring based gravimeter to explore the variation in gravity across two subterranean fuel tanks used by Facilities here at the College. We began by establishing a base station for comparison, then measured the gravity relative to that base station at ten points along a thirty meter line. When viewed in relation to the expected gravitational value of an undisturbed subsurface, negative anomalies were visible at locations where the tanks are stored, which is consistent with what would be expected from a subterranean space that was less dense than the surrounding ground. Three separate analyses were performed, with varying results. The horizontal position of the pair of fuel tanks was derived with sufficient accuracy, but determining their dimensions and depth was less successful. Nevertheless, these results were promising. Expanding our surveyed points from a single line to a two dimensional grid would be the next logical step with this research.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.